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Category: How to Study the Bible (page 1 of 2)

Bible Translations (Chart)

Good Bible study requires regular reading of the Bible.  Since the Bible was written in languages other than modern English (Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek) most people rely upon a translation of the Bible to know the will of God.  However, there are numerous translations available today.  Choosing a good translation can be an overwhelming task.  The chart above will help you make a better decision by knowing what is the philosophy of several of the translations available.

The goal of a translation is to faithfully communicate the words/messages from the original language to the language of a reader in a way that is faithful to the original and readable for the reader.

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Fitting Non-Prophetic Books into the Storyline of the Old Testament (Chart)

This Chart places the non-prophetic books into the historical storyline of the Old Testament (click here to see where the prophetic books fit). Job we are not 100% where to place, but it feels like it would be during the Genesis account.  Leviticus is connected with Exodus because it is instructions to the priesthood, which was established in Exodus. Deuteronomy is a sermon given by Moses before the people go into the promise land.  We know that Song of Solomon, Ecclesiastes, and Proverbs are written during the time of 1 Kings because there are written by Solomon and 1 Kings is where his life is recorded.

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New Testament Story Line (Chart)

The above chart provides the Bible Student with a storyline of the New Testament.  By reading the book of Luke and the book of Acts the reader is able to get the basic story of the life of Christ and the life of the church. The other books are then shown under their respective section in the storyline.  Matthew, Mark, and John deal with the same time in history as Luke.  The Epistles under Acts corresponds with events in Acts (click here for a more in-depth look of how these epistles fit).  The Epistles that are not under a header were written after the completion of Acts.

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The New Testament Storyline and where the Epistles Fit (Chart)

The book of Acts provides historical background for many of the Epistles of our New Testament.  Along with the book of Luke, Acts provides a storyline of the New Testament by giving us both the story of Jesus and the story of the church. The above chart relates the Epistles to their proper place in Acts.  Underneath each epistle, where appropriate, you have the chapter(s) where you can read about the establishment of the particular church(es) to whom the epistle was written and you have the verse references for where Paul was writing from.  With these two you can gain historical background that can be very useful in understanding the particular epistle.

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Placing the Prophets Within the Old Testament Storyline (Chart)

Chronology of the Prophets

The above chart allows the Bible student to see approximately where each of the prophets fit into the storyline of the Old Testament.  The majority of the prophets spoke during the time periods described in 1 and 2 Kings.  When studying each prophet you should make sure to first read the historical background related to the time period in which the Prophet spoke/wrote.  Normally, this can be determined by reading the first verse of the prophetic book.  There the book will tell you, which king the prophet prophesied under.  Once you have that information you can look up the section in 1 and 2 Kings where that particular King(s) is discussed and learn divinely inspired history about the time period the prophet spoke.

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